Act 26 Score Sat Essay

If you registered for the SAT online or you registered by mail and set up a College Board account, you’ll get an email telling you how to sign into your online score report when scores are ready.

Sign in to view scores.

When to Expect Scores

New Score Release Policies

We’re making changes to help you get scores and send them to colleges faster than before. Here’s what you need to know about scores from the 2017-18 weekend administrations:

  • October, November, December, March, and May scores from the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math sections will be released about two weeks after test day. You’ll receive an email when those multiple-choice scores are ready. We’ll send your scores to colleges within 10 days after they’re available to you.
  • If you take the SAT with Essay, you’ll get your SAT Essay scores about five days after receiving your multiple-choice scores. We’ll send score reports to colleges once all your scores are ready.
  • If you request a paper score report, we’ll send it once all your scores are ready (including your SAT Essay scores if you take the essay).
  • August and June scores may take longer—up to six weeks for all scores.

Paper Score Reports

Students who register online and wish to receive a paper score report by mail in addition to the online score report must request it when they register.

Students who register by mail and who don't have active College Board online accounts will receive paper score reports. They can also get their SAT scores by calling customer service, but there’s an additional fee.

Scores by Phone

You can get SAT scores by phone starting on the day they’re released, but there’s an extra fee.

Who Else Sees Your Scores

If you chose score recipients before scores were released, those colleges and scholarship programs will get your score report shortly after you do. Your high school, district, and state will be able to see your scores online too.

Learn how to send your scores.

If Your Scores Aren’t Online Yet

Most scores are available within the same score release window, but some might not be. If you fall within this group, you'll get a message telling you to check back—usually about a week later.

Some reasons scores may be delayed:

  • You took a makeup test later than the actual test day.
  • Your answer sheet was received late.
  • Your answer sheet is missing information.
  • Your answer sheet information is inconsistent with your registration information.
  • An irregularity was reported at your test site.

We understand it can be frustrating if you don't see your scores when you're expecting them, and we appreciate your patience. If your scores aren’t delayed, you can troubleshoot missing scores.

August 26 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • September 18: Your multiple-choice scores become available online.
  • By September 20: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • September 18: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Learn how to send scores.

October 7 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • October 20–26: Your multiple-choice scores become available online during this window.
  • By October 31: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • October 20–26: Online and paper score reports become available during this window.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Learn how to send scores.

October 11 Test Day

If you took the SAT on a school day:

  • November 3: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Score release dates may vary if you took the SAT during a statewide administration.

Learn how to send scores.

November 4 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • November 17–23: Your multiple-choice scores become available online during this window.
  • By November 28: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • November 17–23: Online and paper score reports become available during this window.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Learn how to send scores.

December 2 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • December 15–21: Your multiple-choice scores become available online during this window.
  • By December 26: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • December 15–21: Online and paper score reports become available during this window.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Learn how to send scores.

March 7 Test Day

If you took the SAT on a school day:

  • March 29: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Score release dates may vary if you took the SAT during a statewide administration.

Learn how to send scores.

March 10 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • March 23–29: Your multiple-choice scores become available online during this window.
  • By April 3: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • March 23–29: Online and paper score reports become available during this window.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Learn how to send scores.

March 21 Test Day

If you took the SAT on a school day:

  • April 13: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Score release dates may vary if you took the SAT during a statewide administration.

Learn how to send scores.

April 10 Test Day

If you took the SAT on a school day:

  • May 3: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Score release dates may vary if you took the SAT during a statewide administration.

Learn how to send scores.

April 24 Test Day

If you took the SAT on a school day:

  • May 17: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Score release dates may vary if you took the SAT during a statewide administration.

Learn how to send scores.

May 5 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • May 18–24: Your multiple-choice scores become available online during this window.
  • By May 29: Your SAT Essay scores become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • May 18–24: Online and paper score reports become available during this window.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Register for the May SAT or SAT with Essay.

Learn how to send scores.

June 2 Test Day

If you took the SAT with Essay:

  • July 11: Your multiple-choice and SAT Essay scores become available online.
  • Within 10 days after you receive all scores: We send colleges your scores, and we send your paper score report if you requested one.

If you took the SAT:

  • July 11: Online and paper score reports become available.
  • Within 10 days after you receive scores: We send colleges your scores.

Register for the June SAT or SAT with Essay.

Learn how to send scores.

One of the questions we most commonly hear from students who have taken either the PSAT, the SAT, or the ACT (or even just a practice test for one of these tests) is “what would my score be on the [other test]?” I.e. How do I do an ACT to SAT conversion?

To answer this question, you’ll need to convert your score.

We’ll take a look at why you would want to perform an ACT to SAT conversion, how to do it, and what you can do with your converted scores when you are looking at prospective colleges.

Why Would You Want To Convert Between SAT and ACT Scores?

People have various reasons for wanting to know how they would do on the “opposite test.” They generally boil down to a variation on one of these three (closely related) reasons:

1. You are thinking about taking the other test and you want to know how you would need to score for it to be worth it

2. You have already taken both tests (or practice tests) and you want to know which of your scores is better

3. You have specific colleges in mind and you want to know how your score on one test matches up with their score range on the other test

Regardless of which of these reasons applies to you, figuring out ACT to SAT conversion will probably be most useful if you are still at the practice test / preparation stage of your admissions test journey. This way you can use the information you discover to help guide you in the process.

SAT to ACT Conversion Tables

If you’d like to convert an SAT score to an ACT score, use the following table (by the way, throughout this article, we are referring to the “new” SAT on the 1600 scale simply as the “SAT,” and we will refer to the old, 2400-scale SAT as the “old SAT”). If you’d like to do an ACT to SAT conversion, we have another table further down. This table was created by the College Board without the participation of the ACT, but it is likely to be pretty accurate.

Simply find your SAT score, and match it up with the converted ACT score one column to the right, in the same row.

ACT to SAT Conversion

If you have a score from an ACT test date that you’d like to convert to an SAT score, you can use the following table to do an ACT to SAT conversion, also from the College Board. Find your ACT score, then match it up with the SAT score one column to the right, in the same row.

What About Colleges That Haven’t Published “New” SAT Score Ranges Yet?

If you’re at the point in your college search where you’re looking at the score ranges for students admitted at various colleges, you may have noticed that many colleges have not yet released any information regarding 1600-scale SAT scores, as this “new” test was released in Spring of 2016. Therefore, to do an ACT to SAT conversion, you may want to convert your SAT or ACT score to an “old” 2400-scale SAT score to compare against college figures.

You can convert your ACT score to an “old” SAT score using the following table, published by the ACT:

If you’d like to convert your SAT score on the 1600-scale to an “old” SAT score on the 2400-scale, you can use this table, published by the College Board:

How To Convert Between SAT and ACT Scores

As we wrote in the introduction, you can’t determine exactly how you’d do on the SAT if you took the ACT, or the ACT if you took the SAT.

So, what can you do?

You can use conversion data from the makers of the SAT and the ACT to do an ACT to SAT conversion to determine how your score would rank if it were converted to a score on the opposite test.

These test publishers collect massive amounts of data regarding the scores of hundreds, thousands, millions of students on their respective admissions tests. They break all of these scores into percentiles, which show how many students score each different possible score.

You’ve probably seen this before – if you score 1190 on the SAT, for example, this is a 71st percentile score. That means 71% of all students who take the SAT scored less than 1190, and 29% scored higher. The ACT releases percentile charts showing the same breakdown of information for their test.

The College Board takes these calculations a step further, and produces a series of tables called “concordance tables,” which are designed for ACT to SAT conversion and vice versa. It is a tiny bit complicated, but they basically compare scores that would be at the same percentile on both tests, so you know that if you scored at, say, the 80th percentile on the SAT, you can see which score would put you at the same percentile on the ACT, and that is your “converted” score.

As we have already said, these tables are not designed to show exactly how any individual student would do applying their personal skills to both tests, because we can’t really know based on your score on one test whether or not you might naturally be more suited to performing better or worse on the other test.

What Are Your Next Steps?

Now that you’ve converted your score from ACT to SAT, or from SAT to ACT, or from ACT to “old” SAT, or from – well, you get the picture – what do you do with the information? There is no need to convert your scores if it doesn’t lead to a decision as to what kind of action to take.

The main decision you are likely to make is whether or not to take the test you have not yet taken. You may decide, for example, after an ACT SAT conversion, that you could actually score higher on the ACT than your converted score. In this case, your first step should probably be to take a practice test or seek advice about proceeding with prep for the new test.

On the other hand, after seeing your converted scores, you may not believe that you could do better on the test you haven’t taken, but decide that your current scores aren’t as competitive as you’d like them to be. In this case, you’ll want to look into your options for improving your score on the test to which you have already devoted your energy.

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